With Bear Hands is now on Shoppe

A couple of weeks ago, I began selling some of my mason jar prints on wood via Scoutmob's Handmade Goods and Art section called Shoppe

The way Shoppe works is that Scoutmob offers a discount off the retail price of products from artists, and the artist always receives the wholesale price. Scoutmob also takes care of shipping and some of the packaging materials on behalf of the artist, which is really nice.

Since opening my Shoppe, I've shipped my mason jar prints all over the country, which has been really fun. It's been a great way to spread my work to people who may have never seen it otherwise. 

Also, as an Artist-turning-business-woman, it's really pushed me to fine tune my methods of finishing and packaging work. These things have definitely been a learning process for me, but I find myself, over and over, asking the question, "If I were to receive my art in the mail, how would I want it to be presented?" That, in and of itself, has been extremely valuable. 

To visit my Scoutmob Shoppe, please go here. Happy discount shopping!

Art Opening March 7 at Rala

Stop by Rala for First Friday to see my newest work.

323 Union Ave Knoxville, TN 37902

Opening Mach 7 from 6-9pm

I'm really excited about these pieces, inspired by some of my favorite things. All work is hand-painted and drawn on reclaimed wood with spray paint, acrylic, marker, and paint pens.

© Beth Meadows

© Beth Meadows

If you can't make it this Friday, don't worry! It will be on display until Sunday, March 30.

© Beth Meadows

© Beth Meadows


Here is my artist statement for this show:

Driving from Knoxville to the Smoky Mountains, there are hand-written signs on the side of the road that read "Boiled P-nuts" and "Walking Stick World." I've pulled over to buy the peanuts from the back of a trailer and admired a row of bears carved out of tree trunks nearby. Later I hike and feel a connection to the heritage of this area, and also yearn for a little more. 

© Beth Meadows

© Beth Meadows


Back in Knoxville, there are hand-painted signs all over, my favorites being an ice-cream cone and miniature football players holding up a giant hoagie. I go square dancing and watch hipsters dance with silver-haired sweethearts. 

And then there is this other side of things. I drive around singing the lyrics of catchy pop songs and follow some of the world's most famous fashion designers on Instagram.

Some artists use innovation as their driving force while others have tradition in mind. Some people paint a sign without thinking too much about anything at all. Through my artwork, I give a nod to what is esteemed today while delving deeper into the rich heritage of The South.

Swish

As last year was coming to a close, I started to wind down work-related things, thinking as soon as January 1 hit, I would be ready to start back at it. It's January 13 and I'm still only thinking about it, but hopefully all this thinking will be beneficial in the long run.

I always hear artists talk about how they can't make anything unless they're in the right frame of mind or mood.

I just need to get into the right head space. (Don't ever say that to me, by the way).

I agree creativity can't be forced, but there are so many things to be doing in the meantime to help creativity along. That whole list makes creating artwork possible. 

If I'm not making a painting, there are always emails to write, social media updates to post, phone calls to make, errands to run, websites to update, galleries to research. I have to be careful, though, because I have an addiction to the administrative side of being an artist. Sometimes I run around all day, for days, and forget that the ultimate goal is to be in my studio making artwork. I've learned how to procrastinate from the very thing I've been fighting for so long to do. 

2013 was a great year, not so much because it was wonderful and fun (which it was many times) but because it was challenging and I learned things that are invaluable to me. 

It wasn't too shocking when December hit that my brain said No More, and I gladly went into creative hibernation.

The New Year is quickly waving goodbye, however, and I am still in transition. So instead of being in my studio, I'm sitting down to think, plan, and organize- a lot. My hope is two-fold: to gain more moments this year where I'm not working and also to create more space for all-consuming productivity. 

These times of silence make me think back to when I played basketball in middle school. My coach made us sit in the middle of the court during practice and think about sinking free throw after free throw. Honestly, I can't remember if it helped and I know I sat the bench most of that season.

But I get it now. Let's play some b-ball, y'all. Swish.

Now Showing at Coffee & Chocolate

I currently have artwork on display at Coffee & Chocolate. Below are details and photos of the work. I hope you can find the time to see it this month!

Photo by Matthew Higginbotham

Photo by Matthew Higginbotham

Models and Buildings

Drawings by Beth Meadows

at Coffee & Chocolate, December 2013

327 Union Ave SW, Knoxville, TN 37902

All work is priced upon request. Please contact beth@bethmeadows.com

Patrick Sullivan's (on black) paint pen and acrylic on acetate, lace and fabric, recycled frame

Patrick Sullivan's (on black) paint pen and acrylic on acetate, lace and fabric, recycled frame

Artist Statement:

I have a strong interest in things that are beautifully crafted and designed to stand the test of time. I also listen to pop music and buy things that are made to be thrown away year to year.

 

My subject matter is historic Knoxville buildings and models from fashion magazines. The frames used for the models are recycled and the windows have been salvaged from historic buildings in Knoxville. 

 

As I make these drawings with previously discarded materials, I think about their original creator, the time and thought they put into what they made.  

Historic Knoxville Buildings paint pen and acrylic on acetate, lace and fabric, framed in salvaged windows and recycled frames. Photo by Matthew Higginbotham.

Historic Knoxville Buildings paint pen and acrylic on acetate, lace and fabric, framed in salvaged windows and recycled frames. Photo by Matthew Higginbotham.

I wonder: If the flippant consumer determines the value of things, won't even the most well-designed objects be subject to the landfill?

 

I like to imagine that one day I might walk into a thrift store and see one of my paintings hanging on a wall. What one might regard as a debilitating thought has pushed me to make better work. Better work that does not become too precious to me as the maker. 


Two Models ink, marker, and colored pencil on paper, recycled frames

Two Models ink, marker, and colored pencil on paper, recycled frames

Bio:

Beth moved from her hometown of Memphis, Tennessee to Knoxville where she graduated from the UT with a BFA in Studio Art in 2007. She currently manages The Salvage Room for the non-profit Knox Heritage, receiving and selling historic building materials. She is also the Director and an artist of 17th Street Studios, a work space for artists near downtown Knoxville.

Models in recycled frames. Photo by Matthew Higginbotham.

Models in recycled frames. Photo by Matthew Higginbotham.

Art For the People: Bidding Ends Today at Noon!

Bidding on work from Art For the People ends today at noon! 

To make an offer email beth@bethmeadows.com with the title of the piece and your offer.

I'm taking any offers for this work. There is no minimum bid. The highest offer at noon today will win! 

Thank you!